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One of the most useful tools for the Swiss Straw Lace maker was the straw Splitter.
1995__134__2.jpg - 34454 Bytes Splitter2.jpg - 7208 BytesThis tool had teeth that the straw was drawn across to make the fine splits necessary for creating straw threads and other elements.
SwissThreadss.jpg - 11335 BytesSplits were spun into thread using a spinning wheel similar to those made for other fiber threads. Since straw cannot be spun together to create the longer threads that other fibers do, these threads have to be tied end to end to create the length necessary for some of the work you will see further in this tour.

Once the threads were created they were bundled for sale or for use by others to create bandings and other decorative elements.
ColoredThreadss.jpg - 28437 Bytes Sometimes threads were dyed prior to sale. Straw can be dyed using the same techniques used to dye cloth. The dyeing of whole straws does require special processing prior to dyeing to allow the dye to penetrate the shiny surface of the straw.
ColoredThreads_Close_ups.jpg - 56695 BytesWhat a colorful bouquet of needle lace flowers this bundle of threads might have made!



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All information, photographs and other artwork contained in this site are Copyrighted by
The American Museum of Straw Art. Reproduction of any material is prohibited without
prior written permission.
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